Jun 28, 2022  
2016-2018 Catalog 
    
2016-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Numbering System

The first digit in each course designation is intended to indicate the level of the course. In addition, the first digit also roughly indexes the student’s year of study at the University.

Courses numbered 001 to 099 are non-baccalaureate developmental courses.

Courses numbered 100 to 299 are lower-division.

Courses numbered 300 to 499 are upper-division.

Courses numbered 500 to 599 are graduate level, and may be taken by advanced upper-division, post-baccalaureate, or graduate students for undergraduate or graduate credit.

Courses numbered 600 to 699 are graduate level. These courses may be taken by undergraduate students only on an individual basis, and only with prior, case-by-case approval of the program director of the program offering the course (or his/her designee).

Courses numbered 700 to 799 are doctoral level.

Courses numbered 1000 and above not listed in this catalog because these are professional-level courses carrying University credit, which do not typically apply to credentials or degrees offered by the University. These courses are recorded on student transcripts.

Students should consult relevant sections of this catalog, as well as college and program advising staff, in order to determine which courses are appropriate for their level of study, and which courses satisfy degree requirements for various programs of study.

 

Accounting

Note:
Students who have remained in any ACCT course past the add/drop deadline three times may not register a fourth time for that course.

Transfer credit for Upper-Division Accounting courses will not be accepted from any institution outside of CSUSM.

Upper-Division Accounting courses can only be attempted a total of 2 times (W’s included). Exceptions can be made on a case-by-case basis if a student submits a petition which explains what happened.

  
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    ACCT 201 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

    Units: 3
    Introduction to the accounting information reported to external users, including the accounting cycle, valuation of assets, liabilities and owners’ equity, measurement of net income, and reporting of cash flows. Emphasis is on creation and interpretation of financial statements including required disclosures.

  
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    ACCT 202 - Introduction to Managerial Accounting

    Units: 3
    Introduction to the accounting information created for internal decision makers. Includes product costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgetary control, and incremental analysis. Focus on strategic cost management to support efficient use of company resources.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201  with a C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 301 - Intermediate Accounting I

    Units: 4
    In-depth discussions of accounting theory and practice. Examination of issues related to asset valuation and income determination based on generally accepted accounting principles. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status). Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: A grade of C (2.0) or better on the Financial Accounting Knowledge Test (KAT301) administered by the Department of Accounting at CSUSM.

  
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    ACCT 302 - Intermediate Accounting II

    Units: 2
    In-depth study of financial accounting theory related to long-term liabilities, owners’ equity, and cash flows. A continuation of material covered in ACCT 301 . Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 301  with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 306 - Cost Accounting

    Units: 4
    Review of the cost measurement process and its role in management and control. Includes cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting, variance analysis, and cost systems for pro­duct, process, job and responsibility costing. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 301   or ACCT 305 with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 307 - Tax Accounting

    Units: 4
    Introduction to federal tax concepts with emphasis on individual taxpayers; includes an overview of the statutory construction and methods for accessing tax information. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 301  or ACCT 305 with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 308 - Accounting Information and Systems

    Units: 4
    Basic principles underlying the accounting process and concepts necessary for the preparation of financial statements, both manually and electronically. Includes the design, integrity, and effectiveness of accounting information systems emphasizing the integration of financial information, internal control, and computer technology in decision making and operational support. Students will be exposed to a variety of accounting software applications. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status). Three hours of lecture. Two hours of laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 301  with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 406 - Cost Management, Measurement, and Control

    Units: 2
    In-depth study of the application of activity based cost accounting to the problems of management control in manufacturing, service, and government organizations. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 306  with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 407 - Advanced Tax Accounting

    Units: 2
    Federal income taxation of corporations and partnerships. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 307  with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 416 - Auditing

    Units: 4
    A comprehensive examination of auditing theory, standards, and procedures used by CPAs, with integration of Generally Accepted Auditing Standards. The ethical and legal environments of the independent auditor are also discussed. Should be taken last year of enrollment, preferably last semester. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 302  and ACCT 308  with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 421 - Financial Accounting in Government and Non-Profit Organizations

    Units: 2
    Focuses on financial accounting in government and non-profit organizations. Includes an introduction to cash-based accounting as well as principles of fund accounting, budgeting, accounting, and analysis of financial statements. The general fund, special funds and government-wide financial statements will be covered. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 302  with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 422 - Advanced Accounting

    Units: 2
    Covers business combinations, including consolidated financial statements, including wholly owned and partially owned subsidiaries. Covers the purchase method, as well as the cost method, and equity method of accounting for investments in common stocks. In addition, intercompany transfers are presented. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration - i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 302 .
  
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    ACCT 423 - International Accounting

    Units: 2
    Examines and discusses, in-depth, the issues in international accounting that affect today’s global business world. Subject matter includes international dimensions of financial reporting, auditing, managerial accounting and taxation. Financial reporting issues examined includes, international financial reporting standards, developments in international disclosure and transparency and financial statement analysis. Managerial accounting issues covered are: strategic planning and control, budgeting, product costing, foreign exchange risk management, transfer pricing, and taxation. The challenges and opportunities in developing and transition economies are also examined. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

  
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    ACCT 424 - Accounting Ethics

    Units: 3
    Ethical decision-making and obligations of accounting professionals.  Examination of issues related to ethical reasoning; creation of ethical and effective corporate governance structure; professional ethical codes; legal, regulatory and professional obligations; and corporate social responsibility. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for OM 483 -1.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 301 , ACCT 302 , ACCT 306  and ACCT 307 .
  
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    ACCT 481 - Selected Topics in Accountancy

    Units: 1
    A survey course of selected topics in accounting (in order to supplement available offerings). Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): May vary depending on topic.
  
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    ACCT 482 - Selected Topics in Accountancy

    Units: 2
    A survey course of selected topics in accounting (in order to sup­plement available offerings). Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): May vary depending on topic.
  
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    ACCT 483 - Selected Topics in Accountancy

    Units: 3
    A survey course of selected topics in accounting (in order to sup­plement available offerings). Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): May vary depending on topic.
  
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    ACCT 484 - Selected Topics in Accountancy

    Units: 4
    A survey course of selected topics in accounting (in order to sup­plement available offerings). Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Enrollment restricted to students who have completed all lower-division pre-business core (major status in Business Administration — i.e. attained business status).

    Prerequisite(s): May vary depending on topic.
  
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    ACCT 498 - Independent Study in Accountancy

    Units: 1-4
    Independent study under the direction of a faculty member. The student must prepare a study proposal approved by the appropriate faculty member prior to registration. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

  
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    ACCT 502 - Foundations of Accounting

    Units: 2
    Includes financial and managerial accounting modules. Financial accounting module introduces how firms use financial statements to communicate financial conditions and results of operations to their stakeholders. Managerial accounting module addresses how accountants produce managerial accounting information for internal decision-making. Also includes environment of financial reporting, measurement framework and mechanics of financial accounting, analysis of financial statements, earnings management practices, environment of managerial accounting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and use of cost information in management decision making.

  
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    ACCT 513 - International Financial Reporting Standards

    Units: 3
    Introduction to financial reporting with an emphasis on application of core concepts of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Discussion of the history of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) from its origin to recent developments. Includes financial statements, cash flow statements, revenue, financial assets and liabilities, inventories, intangible assets, income taxes, leases, earnings per share and consolidated financial statements.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 302  with a grade of C (2.0) or better.
  
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    ACCT 525 - Assurance Services and Information Technology

    Units: 3
    Examination and discussion of issues related to information technology and its impacts on auditing tasks, including audit planning, risk assessment, internal controls evaluation, analytical procedures, and substantive test procedures. Explores information technologies available to business organizations and accounting professionals, and how information technology affects accuracy, relevancy, reliability, and completeness of financial statements. Discusses Computer-Assisted Audit Tools and Techniques (CAATTs) to attest clients’ financial statements.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 416 .
  
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    ACCT 531 - Tax Research and Communication

    Units: 3
    Introduces methodologies for researching United States tax law. Includes internet-based research programs used to access tax law, as well as tools used to locate relevant tax authorities in statutory sources, administrative sources, judicial sources, secondary sources, and tax services. Also emphasizes the skills needed to communicate the results of tax law research.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 302 , ACCT 306 , ACCT 308  and ACCT 407 .
  
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    ACCT 560 - Accounting Ethics

    Units: 3
    Explores ethical decision making and obligations of accounting professionals. Examines issues related to ethical reasoning; the creation of ethical and effective corporate governance structure; professional ethical codes; legal, regulatory, and professional obligations; and corporate social responsibility.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 302 , ACCT 306 , ACCT 307 , and ACCT 308 .
  
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    ACCT 561 - Current Professional Issues in Accounting

    Units: 3
    Examination of current issues facing the accounting profession. Emphasis on development and demonstration of the problem-solving skills necessary to address current and future issues facing accounting professionals.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 308 , ACCT 306 , and ACCT 308 .
  
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    ACCT 591 - Current Professional Issues in Accounting

    Units: 1
    Application and development of accounting knowledge and skills outside of the classroom setting by working for private or public business organizations. Involves a minimum of 80 hours worked at the internship site. Prior approval of internship by instructor required. May be taken with maximum of four units for academic transcript credit. Internships cannot be taken for credit towards degree requirements. Grading Basis: Graded Credit/No Credit.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 301 .
  
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    ACCT 592 - Accounting Internship

    Units: 2
    Application and development of accounting knowledge and skills outside of the classroom setting by working for private or public business organizations. Involves a minimum of 160 hours worked at the internship site. Prior approval of internship by instructor required. May be taken with maximum of four units for academic transcript credit. Internships cannot be taken for credit towards degree requirements. Grading Basis: Graded Credit/No Credit.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 301 .
  
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    ACCT 602 - Accounting for Managers

    Units: 2
    Includes financial accounting and managerial accounting modules. The financial accounting module discusses advance topics in preparing financial statements of its operating results. The managerial accounting module covers the use of managerial accounting information to make short-term and long-term business decisions. Also includes financial reporting for operating transactions, long-term assets and investments, financial reporting for financing activities, pricing decisions, activity-based costing, capital budgeting and other long-term decisions, budget planning and control, and decentralization and performance evaluation. Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: Completion or waiver of the MBA Foundations courses.


American Indian Studies

  
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    AIS 101 - Introduction to American Indian Studies

    Units: 3
    Designed to introduce students to American Indian Studies while also giving them the opportunity to engage with and better understand the various methods, theoretical approaches, and issues in American Indian Studies. Provides a broad introduction to American Indian Studies as an intellectual discipline and engages actual people working with local tribal communities. Explores the various ways that American Indian Studies and scholars have produced vibrant and meaningful knowledge.

    Satisfies GE area: D7, D
  
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    AIS 150 - Introduction to Federal Indian Law and Policy

    Units: 3
    Introduces the history and contemporary interpretations of federal Indian law from early American rulings that form the foundation of 21st-century understandings of tribal sovereignty.  Reviews recent legal cases and precedent that impact American Indian land and people.  Provides critical understanding of the legislative process and its effect on American Indians and all U.S. citizens including how to shape future policy and interests in the region, the state, and the nation.

    Satisfies GE area: Dc, Dg
  
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    AIS 220 - American Indian Religion

    Units: 3
    Provides a survey of American Indian religions, philosophies, and worldviews.  Explores the practice of American Indian traditions as a complex, dynamic, and active intellectual, creative and affective system which forms the basis for holistic relationships and interactions between American Indian people, the environment, and other communities.

    Satisfies GE area: C2
  
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    AIS 230 - American Indian Art and Contemporary Issues

    Units: 3
    Introduces contemporary issues in American Indian art, including issues of cultural authenticity and ownership, legal foundations to protect American Indian artwork and artists, cultural misappropriation and theft (eg. pot-hunting), and (mis)representation in the marketplace. Promotes critical reading skills to analyze the social, material, and cultural context that informs artistic production a result of cultural contact in various historical periods.

    Satisfies GE area: C2
  
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    AIS 240 - American Indians and Environmental Issues

    Units: 3
    Provides an overview and examination of environmental issues related to American Indians during the 19th-21st centuries including land tenure disputes, stewardship (occupancy and care of the land), climate change, and other environmental issues from an American Indian perspective focusing on issues affecting California Indians and American Indians in the West/Southwest.

    Satisfies GE area: D
  
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    AIS 280 - American Indian Culture and Language Preservation and Revitalization

    Units: 3
    Explores American Indian cultures and languages and the policies that impact cultural continuity, literacy, and fluency in tribal languages in the US.  Examines community practices to preserve, restore, and/or revitalize culture through language preservation.

    Satisfies GE area: C2
  
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    AIS 290 - American Indian Education: Equity and Social Justice

    Units: 3
    Compares and contrasts American Indian traditional systems of knowledge with western constructs.  Provides an introduction to the legacy of Indian boarding school policies, as well as evaluates the contemporary challenges that American Indians experience in educational systems, such as high dropout rates, low college matriculation rates, and the impact of cultural differences embedded in these trends.

    Satisfies GE area: D
  
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    AIS 348 - American Indian Communities

    Units: 3
    An in-depth examination of American Indian communities, with special emphasis on Southern California Indian communities. Students will understand contemporary issues and concerns facing American Indians today. Themes covered include, tribal sovereignty, demography, decolonization, education, identity, environment, health and wellness, cultural survival, and cultural empowerment. In partnership with local tribes, students will apply the knowledge and analytical skills gained in the classroom to help address environmental, social, and cultural issues within the community. Includes community work and has a field component. Also offered as SOC 348 . May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for SOC 489 -1. Students may not receive credit for both.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    AIS 350 - Imagining Indians: American Indians, Mass Media, Film and Society

    Units: 3
    Designed to provide students with a critical analysis and deeper understanding of American Indian cultures at the intersection of the Mass Media. Examines American Indians in media from the very first instances in America through contemporary media and critically examines the effects of media on American Indian identity, politics, sovereignty, ethnic identity, environment, economic development, health disparities, human rights, spirituality, religious freedom, language and art and the very existence of Indian Country in the 21st century. Examines American Indian cultures as part of the American entertainment cinema, television and as mascots for team sports. Also offered as SOC 350 . May not be taken for credit by students who received credit for NATV 380-1 or SOC 389-5. Students may not receive credit for both.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    AIS 370 - American Indian Women and Activism

    Units: 3
    Examines the roles of American Indian women in politics, social work, academia, business, environmental, health issues, culture and community. Compares and contrasts the ideology of the predominantly white feminist movement with the goals and concerns of the “Red Power” movement and will emphasize American Indian socio-cultural values and concerns. Readings, films, guest lectures will provide an overview of contemporary experiences of American Indian women in the United States from an American Indian perspective. Profiles prominent American Indian female activists, tribal leaders and writers, in addition to topics of serious concern to American Indian women: violence, racism, loss of culture and language, education, health care and other manifestations of continued colonization. Also offered as SOC 370 . May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for NATV 380-3 and SOC 489 -8. Students may not receive credit for both.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    AIS 380 - Topics in American Indian Studies

    Units: 3
    Examination of a topic of study of interest to students in American Indian Studies. Students should check the Class Schedule for listing of actual topics. May be repeated for credit three times as topics change.

  
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    AIS 390 - Independent Study in American Indian Themes

    Units: 3
    Allows students to explore historical, cultural, social, and environmental questions significant to native communities under the supervision of a faculty member in the appropriate discipline. May be repeated for a total of six 6 units. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor and the American Indian Studies Department Chair.

  
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    AIS 400 - Contemporary American Indian Health and Wellness

    Units: 3
    Examines American Indian/Alaskan Native (AIAN) health and wellness from a contemporary public and community health/epidemiologic perspective. Studies current AIAN health status and health behaviors and maintenance of a healthy environment, and theories of health behavior change. Tribal sovereignty and connectedness related to personal/community health and health care access will be evident throughout all aspects of the course. Includes historical and contemporary perspectives and ethical standards for tribally-appropriate health-related research and associated historic issues will be discussed. Also offered as SOC 400 . May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for NATV 380-2 and SOC 489 -6. Students may not receive credit for both.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    AIS 440 - American Indian Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Practice

    Units: 3
    Focuses on comprehension of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and its application in the relationship, care, and management of natural environment and resources such as land, water, plants and animals in American Indian communities.  Utilizes a critical social, legal, and historical framework based on Indian land tenure and stewardship and the inherent relationship to the social and life systems of American Indians.  Students will contrast and analyze cultural differences about ownership related to group/individual responsibility to care for elements of the natural world.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    AIS 468 - American Indian Political and Economic Development

    Units: 3
    Surveys the historical, political, and legal foundations of American Indian political and economic development in the United States. Focuses on the cultural, political, and legal dilemmas posed by tribal governments: how they maintain cultural legitimacy in the face of colonial cultural imposition and how they articulate retained rights in a system of shared sovereignty. An analysis of social, cultural, political, economic, and legal impact of various economic development strategies, including legalized gaming on Native American communities. Also offered as PSCI 418  and SOC 468 . May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for PSCI 390 -4 and SOC 489 -3. Students may only receive credit for one of these courses.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    AIS 480 - Local Archeological Practice

    Units: 3
    Students perform archaeological research relating to local cultural resource management (CRM) and documentation. Students engage with professional archaeologists and Native American communities to learn site research methods and identification and documentation of material culture. Primary goals of this class include providing students with a general understanding of CRM and the legislation that drives CRM; exposing students to archaeological practice in a CRM context, and exposing students to various cultural viewpoints regarding recovered archaeology. Also offered as ANTH 480 . Students may not receive credit for both. Service Learning course. Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: ANTH 200 .

  
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    AIS 481 - American Indian Archeological Monitoring

    Units: 3
    Students work with local Native American bands concerning cultural preservation and the monitoring of archaeological sites threatened by development. Students examine traditional land use management and the traditional knowledge associated with specific sites. Students learn site research methods, identification and documentation of material culture, interpretation of federal, state, county, city, and private documents including Environmental Impact Reports, California Environmental Quality Act, land use legislation, and assessment of cultural significance. Covers preservation options, ethics, and specific case studies. Also offered as ANTH 481 . Students may not receive credit for both. Service Learning course. Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: ANTH 200 .

  
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    AIS 490 - American Indian Studies: Research, Methods, and Applications

    Units: 3
    Overview of theories and methods used in gathering and studying data about historical and contemporary American Indian nations, tribal groups, communities, individuals, and their cultural and social productions.

  
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    AIS 498 - Internship in an American Indian Community

    Units: 3
    Capstone of the Native Studies minor. Designed to equip students for service to native communities. Students will be expected to provide faculty-monitored service with institutions serving reservation or urban native communities, such as (but not limited to) schools, libraries, clinics, urban service centers, youth programs, and study projects supervised by native entities (such as environmental studies). Students will turn in a portfolio reporting on all their activities during their internship. Enrollment restricted to students who have obtained consent of American Indian Studies Department Chair.


Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 200 - Cultural Anthropology

    Units: 3
    A general survey of cultural anthropology, which is one of the main branches of general Anthropology. Employs a global and holistic perspective to examine the economic, social, political, cultural, and ideological integration of society. The comparative, cross-cultural method distinctive to anthropology is used to explore the diverse ideas and behavior that characterize humanity and the human condition. Presents the fundamental questions that cultural anthropologists ask, the methods they use to answer these questions, and some of the uses of anthropological know­ledge. Self-reflection and critical analysis of one’s own world view assumptions and cultural belief system are fundamental objectives of the course.

    Satisfies GE area: D7, D
  
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    ANTH 215 - Human Origins

    Units: 3
    Offers an introduction to human origins from the perspective of biological anthropology. A premise of the course is that the human form and human behavior have evolved together and neither can be fully understood or appreciated with­out a full understanding of the other. Subject matter to be covered includes the geological time frame, evolutionary theory, and the evolution of pri­mates, hominids, and modern humans as evidenced by fossil remains, specific sites, genetic research, and artifacts. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for ANTH 315.

    Satisfies GE area: D
  
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    ANTH 301 - Culture and Medicine -Healers and Healing Practices

    Units: 3
    Every culture and society has had to deal with illness and thus has well-developed concepts about the healing process, healers, medical knowledge, and healing practices. Offers a cross-cultural exploration of healers and healing approaches. Examines differences and similarities in the ways that people approach illness and healing by relying heavily on an abundance of examples from various cultures, including that of the United States. Examines illness causation and classification theories, diagnostic practices, therapeutic procedures, preventive care, the assumptions that underlie these concepts and practices, and their relationship to the social, cultural, and technological environments in which they are constructed. Focuses on the role of the healer in the context of culture and examines physicians, shamans, witch doctors, curandero/as, midwives, wise men and women, and other healers. Explores the use of music, botanicals, healing aids, and pharmaceuticals in the healing process. Informed self-reflection and critical analysis of one’s own world view assumptions and medical belief system are fundamental objectives of the course.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 305 - Medical Anthropology

    Units: 3
    General survey of medical anthropology including the study of specific medical cultures, ethnomedicine, ethnobotany, medical concepts and treatments, illness causation, etiology, diagnostic methods, prognosis, treatment practices, health care delivery systems, patient-provider relationship, cross-cultural medicine, and the organization of health care systems. Includes examination of the role of medical anthropology in cross-cultural medicine.

  
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    ANTH 310 - World Prehistory

    Units: 3
    Provides an interdisciplinary overview of the major developments in the early human past. Drawing upon archaeological, biological, linguistic, and anthropological sources, this global coverage of human prehistory examines ancient cultures and societies of Africa, Europe, the Americas, Asia, and the Pacific. Explores human evolution, adaptive behavior, the hunter and gatherer diaspora, plant and animal domestication, trade, the development of agriculture, and the origins of states. Through cross-cultural comparisons and anthropological theory, explores such subject matter as the origins of gender differences in the division of labor, the role of ideology in cultural adaptation, differential access to technologies, economic production, artistic expression, and mechanisms of cultural change.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 311 - Archaeology of the Holy Land: Bridging the Past and the Present

    Units: 3
    Introduction to the archeology of Ancient Near Eastern societies with an emphasis on Israel, Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan. Other geographical areas covered include Mesopotamia and Egypt. Examines the complex civilizations in those geographic areas and focuses on the material culture and written texts through which we can reconstruct the prehistory and archeology of the Ancient Near East.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 325 - Ancient Mexican Society and Art

    Units: 3
    Examines Ancient Mexican art, cosmology, architecture, mythology, and literature as they reflect social structure, religion, social roles, ideology, economic and political organization, world-view, and the family. Using archeological and ethnographic sources, the course covers the preclassic, classic, and postclassic periods, focusing on several cultural areas including the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Monte Alban and the Zapotec and Mixtec of Oaxaca, the Toltecs, the Maya, and the Aztec, or Mexica. Among other topics to be examined are the calendar, writing, concepts of space and time, the ball game, tribute, human sacrifice and bloodletting, sacred plants, and specific Mesoamerican deities.

    Satisfies GE area: CC
  
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    ANTH 328 - Body and Identity

    Units: 3
    Explores the social construction and performances of the body and identity through a cross-cultural look at definitions and meanings of the body, codes inscribed on it by our everyday practices (wearing makeup, working out), and choices of decorative markers (clothing, jewelry, tattoos, piercings). How are gender, race, ethnicity, and power status signaled by the body? How is rebellion enacted through the body? Anthropological perspectives are used to explore how people approach these issues across cultural, economic, political, social, and religious contexts. Also offered as WMST 328 . Students may not receive credit for both. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for ID 370 -2 and WMST 300 -6.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 330 - Ritual and Religion

    Units: 3
    Ritual and religion have historically been powerful shapers of society. Every society that has existed has asked universal questions like the following: Where do we come from? Why are we here? What are we supposed to do? How are we supposed to act? What happens to us when we die? Provides a cross-cultural and comparative examination of the social, political, economic, cultural, and ideological constructs that people have generated in seeking to answer to these questions. Examines the role of religion as an integral component of world view and social institutions, anthropological theories and findings about comparative religion, and emphasizes the explanatory concepts of religion in its social, environmental, and economic contexts rather than focusing on the specific attributes of differing religions.

  
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    ANTH 340 - Immigration and Health

    Units: 3
    A cross-cultural examination of the impact of human migration on the health of migrant communities in a transnational context. Examines political and economic realities of globalization, health impacts of migration, and the social and political contexts in which immigrants access and utilize health care services. Examines how class, ethnicity, and gender condition the health of migrants.

  
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    ANTH 345 - Culture and Mind

    Units: 3
    Explores the relationship between cultures, and minds, selves, emotions, values, the unconscious, and the concept of mental health.  Includes the nature of emotions, the sources of human identities, and whether all humans share the same kind of mind, or if minds are shaped by a person’s environment.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 350 - Visual Anthropology

    Units: 3
    Explores the field of visual anthropology, including, but not limited to, process and production of ethnographic film, relationship between the filmmaker and the subjects of film, ethnographic photography, visual representation, multimedia presentation of ethnographic data, digitization of ethnographic data, community-led visual ethnography, and the use of ethnographic film in community advocacy.

  
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    ANTH 360 - Indigenous Anthropology

    Units: 3
    An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of indigenous communities. Employing a cross-cultural, multidisciplinary framework this course examines the historical and contemporary relationships among anthropology, the social sciences, and indigenous peoples. Themes covered include how the social sciences and anthropology have engaged with and written about indigenous communities, political decolonization, transnational indigenous rights movements and current paradigms in the social sciences that have led to new ways of imagining and articulating identities. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for ID 370 -8.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 370 - Environment, Population, and Culture

    Units: 3
    Focuses on contemporary world problems from interdisciplinary and anthropological perspectives. Employing the cross-cultural, evolutionary, and multidisciplinary research methods of anthropology and cultural ecology, examines the environmental crisis, rain forest destruction, resource management, consumption culture, world hunger, food systems, population pressure, poverty, energy distribution, the future of the global free market, and the role of ideology in environmental adaptation with the objective to foster crisis awareness and informed response.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 375 - Money, Culture, and Power

    Units: 3
    Money, culture, and power are intertwined. The production of wealth and its distribution are shaped by and influence our worldview, institutions, and social relationships. Using the tools of anthropology, such as ethnography, cross-cultural comparison, and an evolutionary (historical) perspective, this course offers a holistic analysis of how human societies extract, produce, exchange, and distribute resources, from the earliest times to the present.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 379 - Environmental Health and Justice

    Units: 3
    Examines disproportionate burdens of environmental contamination and subsequent health disparities affecting communities of color across the U.S. and internationally. Reviews environmental health and justice through anthropological case studies that illustrate how communities have organized to improve health and justice in their communities. Examines environmental health and justice literature and reviews programs organized to address childhood asthma reduction, lead poisoning prevention, clean-up and restoration of contaminated sites, sustainable/organic agriculture, clean energy programs and cancer and health disparities research.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 380 - Current Archeology

    Units: 3
    General survey of global archaeological sites, archaeological practice, and current issues in archaeology including intellectual property rights and the relationship between archaeology and world/regional cultural resources. Includes study of material culture, the archaeological record, survey and excavation, dating technologies, and subsistence patterns. Includes the examination of local archaeological sites/collections, pictographs, lithic techniques, indigenous land and resource management practices, indigenous knowledge of archaeological sites, including ceremonial, food gathering and processing, village sites, and contemporary use of culturally significant sites by local indigenous bands.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 385 - Divine Lords and Earth Monsters: Archaeology of the Maya

    Units: 3
    Provides an overview of Maya society as part of the Mesoamerican culture area.  Uses archaeological, ethnographic and ethno-historic sources, works of arts, and Maya hieroglyphic texts to explore all facets of Maya society through time.  Topics include indigenous and scientific overview of Maya culture origins, social and political organization, interactions with other Mesoamerican civilizations, architecture, art, agriculture, hieroglyphic writing, mythology, cosmology and religion, the collapse, the Spanish colonial period, and contemporary Maya.

    Satisfies GE area: CC
  
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    ANTH 390 - Anthropological Research Methods

    Units: 3
    Introduces the fundamental methods in cultural anthropology including research design, participant observation, informant selection, organization of field notes, household and community questionnaires, structured and unstructured interviews, oral and life histories, case studies, focus groups, archival research and secondary data, and coding and analysis of qualitative data. Includes construction of research problems, research design, research implementation, preparation of human subject protocols, strategies of data collection and analysis, and report preparation.

  
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    ANTH 391 - Anthropological Theory

    Units: 3
    Introduces and familiarizes students with key theories and theorists in sociocultural anthropology. Focusing on the range of analytic frames that anthropologists have brought to bear (and continue to do so) in trying to conceptualize, understand, account for, and describe the lived world, this course examines the fundamental anthropological models of thinking about and understanding persons in sociocultural milieus. Setting the development of these ideas in their historical contexts, key theorists are also introduced and analyzed.

  
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    ANTH 430 - Medical Ethnography

    Units: 3
    Advanced students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in local health care settings or with local communities with distinct medical cultures. Examines patterns of health service utilization and access to clinical health care, as well as alternatives to clinical health care. Working collaboratively with health care professionals and/or ethnic populations with special health care needs, such as immigrant or indigenous communities, students document and analyze information pertaining to the delivery and consumption of health care services and the generation of health care alternatives. May be repeated for a total of six 6 units. Service Learning course.

  
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    ANTH 440 - Farmworker Health Ethnography

    Units: 3
    Involves field and quantitative ethnographic research regarding the health and health care practices of local farmworker communities. Students record work histories, living conditions, health behaviors, health histories, and use of clinical and non-clinical health care forms to assess the status of health and health care practices among local agricultural workers. Collaboration with the National Latino Research Center results in the production of an annual report on farmworker health in North County San Diego. Service Learning course. Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: ANTH 200 .

  
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    ANTH 460 - Questioning Cultural Competency

    Units: 3
    Examines the relationship between concepts of cultural competency and realities of cultural interface. Focuses on individual and community interaction with health care and other social institutions. Includes cross-cultural capabilities, identification of needs and help-seeking behaviors, and the value of support networks. Examines economic and social barriers to services; institutional adaptation to diversity; and the role of community in decision-making. Students generate research questions and conduct case studies regarding cultural competency and cross-cultural capabilities. Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: ANTH 200 .

  
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    ANTH 465 - Indigenous Health

    Units: 3
    An upper-division field research course that provides students the opportunity to partner with local indigenous communities to conduct original research that examines the relationship between the social determinants of health, health care, cultural competency, and health outcomes. Working in clinical and/or nonclinical settings students develop methodological skills through field research, archival research, interviews and observation. Research topics are determined by the community through the partnership and involve issues of health and wellness and access to and utilization of health care services.

  
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    ANTH 470 - Community Ethnobotany

    Units: 3
    Students engage with local indigenous communities, conduct original research, and participate in the implementation of community goals relating to cultural awareness, preservation, and survival. Students learn anthropological and ethnobotanical methods, including participant observation, field research, ethnographic writing, documentation of plant uses, medicinal values, processing methods, plant lore, etc., while conducting community-based field research with members of indigenous communities, such as the San Luis Rey band of Mission Indians and other local and transnational indigenous communities in the San Diego region. This class meets for four hours each week May be repeated for a total of six 6 units. Course includes a service learning component.

    Satisfies GE area: DD
  
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    ANTH 471 - Plant Medicines and People

    Units: 3
    Examines the cross-cultural production of plant medicines used in the treatment of human ailments ranging from chronic illness to acute conditions. Includes the study of plants int he CSUSM Community Ethnobotany Garden, as well as regionally and globally, in conjunction with ethnographic and literature research. Also includes applied laboratory work to investigate plant-based remedies. 

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 200   or ANTH 215 .
  
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    ANTH 480 - Local Archaeological Practice

    Units: 3
    Students perform archaeological research relating to local cultural resource management (CRM) and documentation. Students engage with professional archaeologists and Native American communities to learn site research methods and identification and documentation of material culture. Primary goals of this class include providing students with a general understanding of CRM and the legislation that drives CRM, exposing students to archaeological practice in a CRM context, and exposing students to various cultural viewpoints regarding recovered archaeology. Also offered as AIS 480. Students may not receive credit for both. Service Learning course. Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: ANTH 200 .

  
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    ANTH 481 - Native American Archaeological Monitoring

    Units: 3
    Students work with local Native American bands concerning cultural preservation and the monitoring of archaeological sites threatened by development. Students examine traditional land use management and the traditional knowledge associated with specific sites. Students learn site research methods; identification and documentation of material culture; interpretation of federal, state, county, city, and private documents including Environmental Impact Reports, California Environmental Quality Act, and land use legislation; and assessment of cultural significance. Covers preservation options, ethics, and specific case studies. Also offered as AIS 481. Students may not receive credit for both. Service Learning course. Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: ANTH 200 .

  
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    ANTH 498 - Directed Research in Anthropology

    Units: 3
    Involves original anthropological research to be directed by instructor. Advanced students in anthropology propose an ethnographic and anthropological research project, or collaborate with original research project to gain experience in field research, data analysis, and write up. Together with ANTH 498C May be repeated for a total of six 6 units.

  
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    ANTH 499 - Directed Research in Medical Anthropology

    Units: 3
    Involves original anthropological research in medicine or health care to be directed by instructor. Advanced students propose an ethnographic and anthropological research project, or collaborate with original research project to gain experience in field research, data analysis, and write up. May be repeated for a total of six 6 units. Together with ANTH 499C


Applied Behavioral Analysis

  
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    ABA 601 - Foundations and Concepts in Behavior Analysis

    Units: 3
    Conceptual and empirical factors underlying the science of behavior. Basic concepts in the science of behavior; in selecting, in defining and measuring behavior; and in evaluating and analyzing behavior change.

  
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    ABA 602 - Behavior Analysis Processes for Behavior Change

    Units: 3
    Essential processes involved in changing behavior based on the main concepts of behavior analysis. Includes reinforcement, punishment, antecedent variables, developing new behavior, and decreasing behavior with non-punishment procedures.

    Prerequisite(s): ABA 601 .
  
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    ABA 603 - Applied Behavior Analysis Applications for Complex Procedures and Promoting Behavior Change

    Units: 3
    Covers area of functional analysis, verbal behavior, special applications of Applied Behavior Analysis, promoting generalized behavior change, and ethical considerations for Applied Behavior Analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): ABA 601  and ABA 602 .
  
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    ABA 604 - Classroom Management, Instructional Methods, and Ethical Consideration in Behavior Analysis

    Units: 3
    Applications of behavior analysis in school settings. Covers areas of conducting functional behavior assessment, the main instructional principles documented in evidenced-based instructional methodologies, and ethical considerations.

    Prerequisite(s): ABA 601 , ABA 602 , and ABA 603 .
  
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    ABA 605 - Applied Behavior Analysis in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Units: 3
    Applying behavior analysis across the Autism Spectrum.

    Prerequisite(s): ABA 601 , ABA 602 , ABA 603 , and ABA 604 .
  
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    ABA 606 - Ethics and Professional Conduct in Behavior Analysis

    Units: 3
    Covers the ethical and professional guidelines and responsibilities for behavior analysis. Areas of application range from classroom instruction, experimental research, and applying behavioral concepts and procedures to a variety of settings. Including educational institutions, business and industry, state agencies, clinical settings, and in-home treatment models.

    Prerequisite(s): ABA 601 , ABA 602 , ABA 603 , ABA 604 , and ABA 605 .

Arabic

  
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    ARAB 101 - Beginning Arabic I

    Units: 4
    An introduction to the Arabic language and Arabic-speaking cultures, with emphasis on the development of communicative skills and grammatical structures. Language laboratory practice is a mandatory component of the course. No prior knowledge of Arabic is assumed.

  
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    ARAB 102 - Beginning Arabic II

    Units: 4
    Continuation of ARAB 101 . Further study of the Arabic language and Arabic-speaking cultures, with emphasis on the development of communicative skills and basic structures. Language laboratory practice is a mandatory component of the course. Enrollment Requirements: At time of enrollment in course, basic knowledge of Arabic (equivalent to that demonstrated upon successful completion of ARAB 101 ), is mandatory.

  
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    ARAB 201 - Intermediate Arabic I

    Units: 3
    Further study of the Arabic language at the intermediate level. Emphasis on development of the skills of reading, listening comprehension, speaking, and writing. Includes study of diverse Arabic-speaking cultures. Conducted in Arabic. Enrollment Requirements: Enrollment Requirement: ARAB 102 , or two 2 years High School Arabic completed within the last two 2 years.


Arts and Humanities

  
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    AH 111 - The Human Experience: Introduction to the Arts and Humanities

    Units: 3
    A thematic and topical exploration of humanistic expression in the past and present. Students are introduced in a comprehensive manner to basic concepts, techniques, and methods of creating and analyzing works of art and literature from various cultures, in various forms and media, and across geographic and temporal boundaries. Content varies each semester. Students experience the arts and humanities as active viewers, listeners and participants, with selected readings from primary texts that are linked to visits to art museums and attendance at live performances (such as concerts, theater, opera). Course can be taken for either C1 or C2 credit, but not both. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for GEH 101 or GEH 102.

    Satisfies GE area: C1, C2

Astronomy

  
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    ASTR 101 - Introduction to Astronomy

    Units: 3
    Provides an introduction to solar system and stellar astronomy. The historical development of astronomy is presented as well as modern theories, observations, and ideas concerning the nature and evolution of planets, stars, and galaxies. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for ASTR 342  or PHYS 342. Satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement for Earth Science.

  
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    ASTR 342 - Elements of Astronomy

    Units: 3
    Provides a practical and historical introduction to astronomy. The course includes solar system astronomy, stellar astronomy, galaxies, and cosmology, with an emphasis on comparative planetology and the historical and cultural development of our knowledge of the solar system. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for PHYS 342.

    Satisfies GE area: BB

Biological Sciences

  
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    BIOL 104 - Principles of Biology: Human Emphasis

    Units: 4
    Principles of cellular, organismal and population biology with primary representation relating to the human organism. Includes study of cells, tissues, and mammalian organ systems. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors. Three hours of lecture. Three hours of laboratory.

    Satisfies GE area: B2, B3
  
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    BIOL 105 - Introduction to Biology/Ecology

    Units: 3
    An introduction to the natural and physical processes governing environmental systems, as well as the ways in which human behavior impacts and is connected to the environment. Studies how living organisms function and evolve with the natural world, covering a diversity of organisms and physical environments. Examples of subjects covered in the course include energy flow, nutrient cycling, population dynamics, and the ecological and biological consequences of human activities. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 105.

    Satisfies GE area: B2
  
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    BIOL 160 - Microbiology for Health Sciences

    Units: 4
    Basic concepts of microbiology, including classification, metabolic activity and the effect of physical and chemical agents on microbial populations. Host parasite interactions, infectious agents, methods of transmission and control are also discussed. This is a Pre-Nursing Core course and enrollment is restricted to approved pre-health science students based on the nursing science impaction criteria. Three hours of lecture. Three hours of laboratory.

  
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    BIOL 175 - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    Units: 4
    The first in a two-course series designed to introduce the principles of human anatomy and physiology for students in health and human services, including Nursing. Taught from a systems perspective where students will learn basic physiological principles and mechanisms along with their associated anatomical basis. Material includes anatomical terminology, cell and tissue structure and function, basic biochemical and metabolic pathways and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, digestive and excretory systems. This is a Pre-Nursing Core course and enrollment is restricted to approved pre-health science students based on the nursing science impaction criteria. Three hours of lecture. Three hours of laboratory.

    Satisfies GE area: B2, B3
  
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    BIOL 176 - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    Units: 4
    The second in a two-course series designed to introduce the principles of human anatomy and physiology for students in health and human services, including Nursing. Taught from a systems perspective where students will learn basic physiological principles and mechanisms along with their associated anatomical basis. Material includes nervous system and the senses, and the endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. This is a Pre-Nursing Core course and enrollment is restricted to approved pre-health science students based on the nursing science impaction criteria. Three hours lecture. Three hours of laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 175 .
  
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    BIOL 177 - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology for Kinesiology I

    Units: 4
    The first in a two-course series designed to introduce the principles of human anatomy and physiology for students in Kinesiology. Taught from a systems perspective students will learn basic physiological principles and mechanisms along with their associated anatomical basis. Includes anatomical terminology, cell and tissue structure and function, basic biochemical and metabolic pathways, nervous system and the senses, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and excretory systems. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors. Three hours of lecture. Three hours of laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): BIOL 104 .
    Satisfies GE area: B2, B3
  
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    BIOL 178 - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology for Kinesiology II

    Units: 4
    The second in a two-course series designed to introduce the principles of human anatomy and physiology for students in Kinesiology. Taught from a systems perspective students will learn basic physiological principles and mechanisms along with their associated anatomical basis. Material includes nervous system and the senses, and the endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Enrollment restricted to Kinesiology majors. Three hours of lecture. Three of hours of laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 104 , BIOL 177 .
  
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    BIOL 210 - Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology

    Units: 4
    The first of a two-semester core sequence that provides the student with basic knowledge in biology, including specific experimental techniques and familiarity with the scientific method.  Emphasizes cellular structure and physiology, molecular evolution, classical and molecular genetics, and biochemistry Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): CHEM 150 .
  
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    BIOL 211 - Introduction to Organismal and Population Biology

    Units: 4
    The second of a two-semester core sequence that provides the student with basic knowledge in biology, including specific experimental techniques and familiarity with the scientific method. Emphasizes physiology, development, diversity of life, evolution, and ecology. Three hours lecture. Three hours laboratory. Field trip(s) during or outside of class (including weekends) may be required.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 210  with grade of C (2.0) or better.
    Satisfies GE area: B2, B3
  
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    BIOL 212 - Evolution

    Units: 3
    A consideration of evolution as the unifying concept in biology. Diversity and adaptation of form, function, and behavior of living organisms. Biological, geological, anthropological, and chemical evidence for and mechanisms of evolutionary change, including global pattern of distribution and specialization, mass extinctions, the evolution of race and sex, and the origin of species. Enrollment restricted to Biological Sciences Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 210  with a grade of C (2.0) or better
  
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    BIOL 215 - Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis

    Units: 4
    Design and analysis of biological surveys and experiments. Includes hypothesis formation, experimental design, statistical analysis, presentation of results, and hands-on experience in design and analysis of biological experiments.

 

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